About

About

With the arrival of the internet, questions of self-identity have become the root of my investigations and have revealed that cultural otherness has really just begun to be recognized as having its own category within society. I use my work as a coping mechanism for understanding a childhood full of trauma stemming from cultural otherness, during which I attempted to assimilate into other cultures and find my sense of belonging.

Much like the trauma that Rosalind Krauss used to describe Marcel Duchamp, after being subjected to the introduction of modern photography, the internet plays a similar role for me as a kind of traumatic index and mirror to society. In addition, Krauss has also described the self-identification of a child as one of an “other” & that this notion leads to a feeling of alienation.

As a person who identifies as an “other” and grew up without any specific archetypes to attach myself to, I've always been faced with a similar notion of alienation from societal categories, making self-identification difficult to pinpoint. My paintings and sculptures act as a commentary on the consistent filtration I must perform, as I selectively pick what I deem to be personal reality and personal culture.

The visual attacks from media and the absence of a cultural presence for “others” in Western society, has forced me to fabricate my own torrents of reality and bulletins of self-hood; a process that involves intuitively salvaging from my environment. Responding to the bombardment of color, culture, and imagery that forms Western pop culture, my artwork is a form of visual and physical self-identification. I intuitively respond to this chaos by building my own cultural and visual experiences in the form of painted facets and figures.